Why Are We Ashamed to Call ‘Get Out’ and ‘The Shape of Water’ Horror Films?

theblackelf:

That blurb misses the point a bit, try this one:

The ‘bad guy’ in both is the status quo.

‘Get Out’‘s villain is a white woman, and her white family is involved. Their whiteness and racism are their thematic cores.

‘The Shape of Water’‘s villain is a stereotypical clean cut white male. He’s military. He’s a flag-flying, country-serving, head-of-the-household jingoistic posterboy for the patriarchal identity. He’s sexist. He’s racist. All of those -isms are the monster: bigotry.

Both of these movies are told from the POV of a victim of bigotry.

The person the audience is least likely to feel they can’t empathize with (the white family in ‘Get Out’, the strong-jawed white officer in ‘The Shape of Water’) turns out to be the person they SHOULD have empathized with all along, and both movies imply that if they didn’t they should feel bad.

Both movies made white people into the monsters for ONCE and that’s too scary to them to admit. If they validate these movies as horror, they’d have to validate the horrors of their actions and they don’t want to.

Why Are We Ashamed to Call ‘Get Out’ and ‘The Shape of Water’ Horror Films?

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